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Subcontractor guilty of manslaughter in worker death at 1 Seaport

Sometimes negligence is treated as a criminal offense, and rightfully so. Recently, a construction subcontractor pleaded guilty to second degree manslaughter in the 2017 death of worker Juan Chonillo, who fell to his death at the 1 Seaport luxury high-rise at 116 Maiden Lane.

The New York Post reported that SSC High Rise admitted guilt in the 44-year-old father's death, which stemmed from a violation of building codes, according to the Manhattan district attorney's office. SSC was also found to have stolen more than $500,000 in wages from more than 50 workers and failed to report $2 million in payroll.

NYC construction injuries: The monthly DOB reports say a lot

Most of us know that New York City construction work can be dangerous. But did you know the Department of Buildings releases a monthly report listing construction accidents? 

Report entries typically list the date and location of the accident, the name of the contractor, details about what happened to the injured worker, and other information. It can be helpful to see how frequently these accidents are reported -- and how serious the injuries often are.

Another scaffolding nightmare: Workers escape death in TriBeCa

New York City construction workers continue to be subjected to dangerous conditions on scaffolds. In recent months, multiple workers have died because of scaffolding mishaps; this summer, one man was killed by a falling beam on a site in Upper Manhattan.

Recently two glaziers eluded death and apparently escaped unharmed after their scaffold was spun around by winds, smashing windows hundreds of feet in the air and leaving the scaffold protruding perpendicular to the high rise they were working on. The harrowing scene was captured on video and reported by ABC-7.

More loose scaffolding -- and another NYC construction fatality

Another construction worker was killed by a falling piece of scaffolding in New York City, this time on a site on Riverside Drive in upper Manhattan. According to NBC New York, the city’s Department of Buildings (DOB) issued a stop-work order against the contractor at a high-rise building associated with Columbia University.

The tragic, preventable accident occurred on July 12 in the courtyard of International House, a well-known housing community for Columbia students. A 28-year-old worker from Staten Island was hit in the head by a beam that fell 12 stories; he was pronounced dead shortly thereafter at St. Luke’s Hospital, according to the NBC report.

Another scaffolding nightmare: Workers escape death in TriBeCa

New York City construction workers continue to be subjected to dangerous conditions on scaffolds. In recent months, multiple workers have died because of scaffolding mishaps; this summer, one man was killed by a falling beam on a site in Upper Manhattan.

Recently two glaziers eluded death and apparently escaped unharmed after their scaffold was spun around by winds, smashing windows hundreds of feet in the air and leaving the scaffold protruding perpendicular to the high rise they were working on. The harrowing scene was captured on video and reported by ABC-7.

Construction worker tragically killed in Staten Island

A tragic construction accident occurred on August 10 in the Westerleigh area of Staten Island. A 50-year-old worker was killed by a chainsaw he was operating.

According to a report from silive.com, the deceased man was working in a hole in the road, cutting a pipe, when he slipped and the saw fatally cut his throat. His crew was assigned to an installation of sewers and water mains at the intersection of Fiske Avenue and Main Avenue.

NYC construction injuries: The monthly DOB reports say a lot

Most of us know that New York City construction work can be dangerous. But did you know the Department of Buildings releases a monthly report listing construction accidents?

Report entries typically list the date and location of the accident, the name of the contractor, details about what happened to the injured worker, and other information. It can be helpful to see how frequently these accidents are reported -- and how serious the injuries often are.

When construction workers fall: CDC stats about a safety epidemic

Among its many functions, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) researches and offers statistics on occupational injuries affecting construction workers. The agency is charged with identifying health risk trends and helping to improve the lives of Americans. When it comes to workers who are hurt and killed because of falls on the job, the stats are staggering.

According to the CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), nearly 10 million people worked in the American construction industry in 2016 -- that's about three percent of the total population. If you or someone you love works construction, it is important to understand the importance of vigilant safety awareness and to know the causes of common injuries.

Why construction workers don't talk to a lawyer when they're hurt

A construction accident can wreak physical, financial and emotional havoc in your life. If you are injured on the job, there may be huge medical bills and rehab costs, lost income and other serious problems for you and your family, now and in the future.

If you have been hurt while working construction, a lawyer may be able to help you recover full and fair money damages to help your family and make sure their needs are provided for. Construction injury lawyers understand how the law works when it comes to negligence and causes of injuries. In general, they offer a free, confidential consultation to review your case, and they don't get paid unless you recover compensation for your losses.

Same-level slips, trips and falls: Impact on construction workers

The construction industry has offered good opportunities to generations of New York City workers. But those jobs can be especially hazardous when worker safety isn't taken seriously by project owners and contractors.

For workers and their families, falls from heights can be tragic. Yet it is important to also understand the huge impact of falls on the same level, most of which are commonly referred to as slip-and-fall and trip-and-fall accidents. The resulting injuries affect the lives of thousands of workers each year.

Case Results

Since 1965, we’ve recovered over $1 BILLION on behalf of our clients. read more
  • $2.1 million settlement

    for 33-year old electrician who fell from ladder while attempting to fit heavy cable into crown box when cable sprung back and struck him, causing him to suffer left shoulder injury with impingement.

  • $1.6 million settlement

    for 38-year old electrician who slipped and fell on debris on stairway with resulting cervical herniated disc and aggravation of pre-existing arthritic changes.

  • $2.55 million settlement

    for 42-year old electrician who fell into an uncovered, unprotected hole and suffered a severe low back injury with herniated disc(s) that required surgery at L4-5 and L5-S1 levels.

  • $1.75 million settlement

    for 26-year old construction worker who fell through opening in roof and fractured his wrist, requiring surgery with open reduction and internal fixation, external fixation device, and eventual fusion.

  • $2.5 million settlement

    for 38-year old female electrician (with history of prior neck injury) who tripped on uneven Masonite protective floor covering, and suffered neck injury with herniated discs requiring cervical fusion.

  • $1.2 million settlement

    during trial for 40-year old sheet metal worker who was struck in the neck and shoulder by an air conditioning unit and suffered herniated cervical discs and cervical radiculopathy.

*AV Preeminent is the highest rating of Reed Elsevier Properties Inc., used in accordance with the Martindale-Hubbell certification procedures, standards and policies. Martindale-Hubbell is the facilitator of a peer review rating process. Ratings reflect the confidential opinions of members of the Bar and the judiciary. Martindale-Hubbell ratings fall into two categories - legal ability and general ethical standards.

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